Focus on Frogs!

Frogs have always been close to my heart for reasons I can’t fully explain. One of my very first memories is of me discovering a frog in our little pond and just picking it up in wonder. I just find them to be such unique little creatures. They can be beautiful and plain, they’re strong and agile, yet very fragile.

So naturally, the decline of frog populations worldwide is a big concern to me, and it’s a subject I follow with interest and a cause I support. I currently contribute to the Johannesburg Zoo’s frog breeding program under their ‘adopt-an-animal’ program. Technically I have adopted 2 painted reed frogs, but actually, I just donated funds to support the work and research they’re doing. Their whole set up there is really fascinating, and if you get a chance to go to the Zoo, find someone to tell you a little about it (just looking at it doesn’t exactly inspire much, and the painted reed frogs are so little that you seldom see them from outside, plus the rain frogs – I think that’s what they are – just hide in the sand, so the chances of seeing them are slim to nothing unfortunately).

Anyway, in support of Save the Frogs Day today, I have decided to post a the few photos I have managed to take of frogs in the last year or so. Hopefully sharing my love of frogs will inspire you enough to see them in a different light to what you have done up till now and to recognise their importance in our environment.

For more information about frogs and their plight please visit: http://savethefrogs.com/ and http://www.amphibianark.org/

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Photo notes: I must just say that frogs aren’t the easiest guys in the world to photograph – I have so much respect for wildlife photographers who capture amazing pictures of frogs.
These pictures were taken in Kosi Bay, the Kruger National Park and the Overberg region.
Identifying frogs is an art slightly beyond me, so if anyone can identify the first two (or let me know if I’m wrong about any of the others) I would be most grateful. I think the first bright green one is a Tinker Reed frog, and suspect that the second little brown guy is some sort of leaf litter frog. (He blended in with the dead leaves so amazingly). Next up we have a Raucous Toad, then 3 Painted Reed Frogs, another Raucous Toad and a Western Leopard Toad.